SOUTHESSEXARTSANDCULTURE

SOUTHESSEXARTSANDCULTURE

In the mid-nineties, David Eng was a professor of English and comparative literature at Columbia, and Shinhee Han, a psychotherapist, worked for the school’s counselling and psychological services. After a seemingly popular Korean-American undergraduate at Columbia committed suicide, Eng and Han got to talking about what seemed, to them, like a wave of depression afflicting […]

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Though David Crosby’s recording career began in the early nineteen-sixties, as a founding member of the folk-rock band the Byrds, the singer and guitarist has been enjoying a curious renaissance in recent years. “Remember My Name,” a new documentary about Crosby—directed by A. J. Eaton and co-produced by Cameron Crowe, who conducts many of the film’s […]

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On Sunday afternoon, the Guatemalan government issued a statement cancelling a highly anticipated meeting, scheduled for Monday, in Washington, between Jimmy Morales, the President of Guatemala, and Donald Trump. The subject of the meeting was a deal between the two countries that would allow the U.S. government to begin sending asylum seekers to Guatemala under […]

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It’s useful, always, to consult the stylebook. Earlier this year, the Associated Press belatedly revised its entry on race, which now reads, “Do not use racially charged or similar terms as euphemisms for racist or racism when the latter terms are truly applicable.” The recommendation is a concession to clarity, not to passion or politics. […]

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Among my fellow punctuation nerds, I have a reputation as someone who has no use for semicolons. I don’t hate semicolons; I hate writing about semicolons. Fortunately, now I don’t have to, because Cecelia Watson, a self-identified “punctuation theorist” who teaches at Bard College, has written a whole book about them: “Semicolon: The Past, Present, […]

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