Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenHillicon Valley: Biden calls on Facebook to change political speech rules | Dems demand hearings after Georgia election chaos | Microsoft stops selling facial recognition tech to police Trump finalizing executive order calling on police to use ‘force with compassion’ The Hill’s Campaign Report: Biden campaign goes on offensive against Facebook MORE has opened up a 9-point lead over President TrumpDonald John TrumpSenate advances public lands bill in late-night vote Warren, Democrats urge Trump to back down from veto threat over changing Confederate-named bases Esper orders ‘After Action Review’ of National Guard’s role in protests MORE in six states where Republican senators face difficult reelection battles this fall, according to a new poll.

The survey from Hart Research Associates finds Biden at 50 percent and Trump at 41 percent among voters sampled in Arizona, Colorado, Iowa, Maine, Montana and North Carolina.

Trump won four of those states in 2016, with the exception of Maine and Colorado. All six states feature vulnerable GOP incumbents: Sens. Marth McSally (Ariz.), Cory GardnerCory Scott GardnerSenate advances public lands bill in late-night vote OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Interior faces legal scrutiny for keeping controversial acting leaders in office | White House faces suit on order lifting endangered species protections | Lawmakers seek investigation of Park Police after clearing of protesters The Hill’s Campaign Report: Republicans go on attack over calls to ‘defund the police’ MORE (Colo.), Joni ErnstJoni Kay ErnstGeorge Conway group hits Ernst in new ad GOP senators introduce resolution opposing calls to defund the police The Hill’s Campaign Report: Republicans go on attack over calls to ‘defund the police’ MORE (Iowa), Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsRepublicans prepare to punt on next COVID-19 relief bill Trump tweets spark fresh headache for Republicans Trump’s tweet on protester sparks GOP backlash  MORE (Maine), Steve DainesSteven (Steve) David DainesSenate advances public lands bill in late-night vote Koch-backed group launches ad campaign to support four vulnerable GOP senators OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Interior faces legal scrutiny for keeping controversial acting leaders in office | White House faces suit on order lifting endangered species protections | Lawmakers seek investigation of Park Police after clearing of protesters MORE (Mont.) and Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland TillisKoch-backed group launches ad campaign to support four vulnerable GOP senators The Hill’s Campaign Report: It’s primary night in Georgia Tillis unveils new 0,000 ad in North Carolina Senate race MORE (N.C.).

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The poll found the Democratic challengers leading the Republican incumbents by a margin of 46 to 41. Republicans currently hold 53 seats in the Senate, meaning Democrats need to flip four to win back a majority.

The survey was conducted to measure voter appetites for mail balloting during the coronavirus pandemic.

Trump and some Republicans have been resistant to the idea, warning mail voting is susceptible to fraud.

The poll found broad support for voting by mail, with 85 percent of voters in the six battlegrounds saying there should be a mail option because of the pandemic.

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Eighty-three percent of voters said they support congressional action to expand access to mail balloting, including 67 percent of Trump supporters. There is near-universal support for mail balloting among Democrats.

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Fifty-six percent of voters who said they plan to support the GOP senator up for reelection said the incumbent should support a vote-by-mail option.

If the GOP senator opposed legislation to expand mail-in balloting, 62 percent of voters said they would view the decision unfavorably, and 90 percent said they believe the decision would have been driven by politics.

Fifty-nine percent of voters overall said they do not believe that mail-in balloting is subject to fraud or corruption.

The Hart Research survey was conducted on behalf of the Democracy For All 2021 Action campaign. The survey of 805 likely voters in the six states has a 3.5 percentage point margin of error.