Rep. Beto O’RourkeBeto O’RourkeBiden will help close out Texas Democrats’ virtual convention: report O’Rourke on Texas reopening: ‘Dangerous, dumb and weak’ Parties gear up for battle over Texas state House MORE has doubled his support in a new CNN poll measuring the popularity of possible Democratic presidential candidates.

Nine percent of Democrats polled said they would likely support O’Rouke in the 2020 race, putting him second in the poll behind former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenHillicon Valley: Biden calls on Facebook to change political speech rules | Dems demand hearings after Georgia election chaos | Microsoft stops selling facial recognition tech to police Trump finalizing executive order calling on police to use ‘force with compassion’ The Hill’s Campaign Report: Biden campaign goes on offensive against Facebook MORE, who won 30 percent, and Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersThe Hill’s 12:30 Report: Milley apologizes for church photo-op Harris grapples with defund the police movement amid veep talk Biden courts younger voters — who have been a weakness MORE (I-Vt.), who won 14 percent. 

Both Biden and Sanders have much higher name recognition than O’Rourke, however, and Biden saw his support fall slightly. 

In a similar Oct. 4-7 poll, Biden won 33 percent of the vote and Sanders won 13 percent. O’Rourke only received 4 percent support in that poll, which was conducted during his Senate campaign against Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzSenate advances public lands bill in late-night vote The Hill’s Morning Report – Trump’s public standing sags after Floyd protests GOP senators introduce resolution opposing calls to defund the police MORE (R-Texas). O’Rourke lost that race, but it was a close result that has propelled him further into the presidential discussion.

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O’Rourke has met with a number of prominent Democrats in recent weeks, including former President Obama and Rev. Al Sharpton.

O’Rourke’s rising support may be coming at the expense of other Democrats.

Both Democratic Sens. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisRand Paul introduces bill to end no-knock warrants The Hill’s Campaign Report: Biden campaign goes on offensive against Facebook McEnany says Juneteenth is a very ‘meaningful’ day to Trump MORE (Ca.) and Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenWarren, Democrats urge Trump to back down from veto threat over changing Confederate-named bases OVERNIGHT DEFENSE: Joint Chiefs chairman says he regrets participating in Trump photo-op | GOP senators back Joint Chiefs chairman who voiced regret over Trump photo-op | Senate panel approves 0B defense policy bill Trump on collision course with Congress over bases with Confederate names MORE (Mass.) lost 5 percent support in the poll, with Harris falling from 9 percent to 4 percent, and Warren falling from 8 percent to 3 percent. 

Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerRand Paul introduces bill to end no-knock warrants Black lawmakers unveil bill to remove Confederate statues from Capitol Harris grapples with defund the police movement amid veep talk MORE (D-N.J.) finished fourth in the poll with 5 percent, the same level of support he won in October.

Harris and former Secretary of State John KerryJohn Forbes KerryThe Memo: Trump’s troubles deepen as voters see country on wrong path The continuous whipsawing of climate change policy Budowsky: United Democrats and Biden’s New Deal MORE, who ran for president as the Democratic nominee in 2004, each won 4 percent. 

Along with Warren, former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg and Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharHillicon Valley: Biden calls on Facebook to change political speech rules | Dems demand hearings after Georgia election chaos | Microsoft stops selling facial recognition tech to police Democrats demand Republican leaders examine election challenges after Georgia voting chaos Harris grapples with defund the police movement amid veep talk MORE (D-Minn.) won 3 percent.

The poll, conducted by SRS, interviewed 463 Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents between Dec. 6 and 9. The margin of error among the sample was 5.6 points.