Verizon introduced a new argument against net neutrality this week, claiming that a lack of “fast lane” services could hurt blind, deaf, and disabled internet users.

According to Mother Jones, Verizon lobbyists on the Hill claimed that without fast lane internet, disabled Americans could be faced with substandard service as web traffic increases and risk missing out on vital technology in emergency situations.

The argument comes as the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) considers a proposal that would end net neutrality, a current regulation that ensures equal treatment of websites by internet service providers (ISPs). If approved, the plan would allow ISPs like Verizon to charge companies for internet service, potentially giving a major advantage to web giants who could afford to pay premium charges for faster-loading websites, videos, and other content.

Reactions from both public and private sectors to the fast lane proposal have been divisive, with big tech companies like Google publicly standing against the plan, while broadband providers like Verizon and AT&T have acted in support of it.

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